Even small companies benefit from strong branding.

September 01, 2015

Every client we speak to shares what she considers to be her company’s unique selling point, or the attribute that makes her company better than its competition. However, this message is rarely conveyed through our client’s branding when she first comes to us.

We’ve been told several times that it’s impossible to create a strong brand image because the company is too small, or that the market is saturated with competition.

This is where we come in and tell you that creating a strong brand image is not out of your reach, and that investing in creating and maintaining it will yield higher profit in the long-term. Even if your goal isn’t to grow your business to a point where you have multiple offices and employ a hundred people, a strong brand image will make your business more prominent when compared to your competition. You can create brand loyalty, and this will naturally give your services added value.

 

How can branding help me, if my business is small enough to survive on referrals?

Okay, so let’s suppose that your business is very small, such as a two-person brokerage real estate agency. You might be inclined to think that a strong brand image doesn’t go hand-in-hand with a boutique company, or that it simply won’t make much of a difference. Small companies generally don’t have much overhead, so you might be doing just fine on referrals. However, there is peace of mind to be gained by having a company that is sustainable when your referral leads run out. That’s right, we’re talking about having a company that generates fresh, qualified leads. 

Having a professional logo, an easy-to-navigate website, and a consistent brand message through all of your media is key in landing more business.

My company has a logo and a look, but how do I know if my branding is strong enough?

Strong branding is a subjective term. An untrained eye may not understand the difference between having a pretty brand and an effective brand. Colors, sophistication, layout, and content all work together to create a brand message. A marketing professional that specializes in branding can quickly determine if all of your company’s collateral is working in unison and sending the right message.

In general, however, strong branding is achieved when a company’s visual components effectively convey the type of service that a client can expect. The branding must match the business, the quality of the service it provides, and any attributes that differentiate it from the competition.

Branding is responsible for many things, thus it can’t be done by just one person. The same way the car you drive tells people several things about your personality, a company's brand sends a powerful message.

Are you ready to create a strong brand for your company? Let’s meet.